shareyourstory

A little bit about our NEW Editor in Chief, Jessica Hutt!

Jessica Hutt  

Jessica Hutt  

Jessica Hutt is a sixteen-year-old writer and blogger from New Jersey. She is the assistant editor of her school’s current events magazine, and has a personal blog entitled Jess for Success. Jessica also writes for Pressing the Future, an online publication dedicated to sharing the stories of young reporters across the globe, and founded its first local chapter. In addition, Jessica has been trained as a writer by the School of the New York Times and New York University Pre College. She enjoys writing for online magazines Balter Monthly and Redefy, a for-teens, by-teens nonprofit fighting stereotypes and promoting positive perspectives.

Frustrated by the stigma surrounding mental illness and the lack of available resources for struggling youth, Jessica became involved with Tangible Movement. She is the editor in chief of Tangible Movement, and creates content for the blog. With the help of  Tangible Movement, Jessica hopes to be the generation to erase the taboo of mental illness, and to provide aid to young adults struggling with substance abuse, depression, identity issues, and more.  

Instagram: @jessica.hutt

twitter: @jessicahutt3

NYC Schools K-12th Grade Now Teach About Mental Health!

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A new law that took effect in New York state on July 1, 2018 means that schools will now teach about mental health as part of health education classes, according to NBC. Not only does the new curriculum promote greater understanding of various mental health conditions, but classes also include exercises in describing feelings, and developing increased emotional intelligence over time. NBC further reports that New York is the first U.S. state to require that mental health education be part of health class curriculum, and that the new guidelines could go a long way towards helping eradicate stigmas associated with mental illness. 🙏🏼🙌🏼👍🏼

Radio Show

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Thank you to Mikalah Gordon for having our founder Torri Shack  on “The Morning Beat” radio show on 97.1 HD-2. She was there to talk about Tangible Movement as well as Suicide Prevention and Awareness Month. Its important to keep talking about matters related to Mental Illness, Suicideand Addiction. We as a collective need to bring as much consciousness as possible to these issues in order to help end the stigma and encourage individuals to seek help.

Sherri Bankston’s personal story of how depression and her husbands suicide has effected her.

I am 54 years old with a family history of depression.  I began taking anti-depressants in my late 20's.  They worked and still do.  In the beginning, every couple of years I would stop taking the medication and think to myself...I can do this, I do not need the medication.  I was always back on the medication within a couple of months.  I have come to accept that depression is a mental illness and something I can’t help or tackle on my own.  My husband supported me and helped me through my ups and downs.
About 5 years ago, I noticed my husband was not the same and was showing signs of depression.  I talked to him about it, and having gone through it with me, I was surprised he was so dismissive about his own depression.  He refused to acknowledge that he too was not suffering from depression.  I believe his was brought on by his mother's Alzheimer's and Parkinson struggle and her ultimate death.  When my husband was going for a routine doctor visit, I called the doctors office and told them I thought he was depressed and asked them to speak to my husband about it.  They did and he was dismissive of them. 

Three years ago, my husband committed suicide by hanging himself.  Needless to say, the vision of him hanging in his underwear is a vision that is forever etched in my memory.  It is also a vision that wakes me up in the middle of the night, still, in a cold sweat. 

In addition to this memory, I have the  memory of telling my son that his father was dead, committed suicide and watching a 26 year old man, still my baby, drop to his knees in the parking lot sobbing.  This memory too also wakes me up some nights in a cold sweat.

I lost both of my parents during the past 5 years to illness/age, lost my husband to suicide and have seen my son experience something no 26 year old should have to experience. 

Grieving is one thing, but to grieve the loss of someone you lost because of suicide is an entirely different process.

I struggle with the anxiety of worrying if something happens to me, my son will have no parents.  To be honest this scares the shit out of me. 

Writing this email has taken me 2 days but it has been cathartic in a sense. 

If I can help one person, then it will be worth it. 

Thanks,
Sherri





"I shall pass through this world but once. Any good therefore that I can
do, or any kindness that I can show to any human being, let me do it now.
Let me not defer not neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again."    -  Unknown