genderequality

A little bit about our NEW Editor in Chief, Jessica Hutt!

Jessica Hutt  

Jessica Hutt  

Jessica Hutt is a sixteen-year-old writer and blogger from New Jersey. She is the assistant editor of her school’s current events magazine, and has a personal blog entitled Jess for Success. Jessica also writes for Pressing the Future, an online publication dedicated to sharing the stories of young reporters across the globe, and founded its first local chapter. In addition, Jessica has been trained as a writer by the School of the New York Times and New York University Pre College. She enjoys writing for online magazines Balter Monthly and Redefy, a for-teens, by-teens nonprofit fighting stereotypes and promoting positive perspectives.

Frustrated by the stigma surrounding mental illness and the lack of available resources for struggling youth, Jessica became involved with Tangible Movement. She is the editor in chief of Tangible Movement, and creates content for the blog. With the help of  Tangible Movement, Jessica hopes to be the generation to erase the taboo of mental illness, and to provide aid to young adults struggling with substance abuse, depression, identity issues, and more.  

Instagram: @jessica.hutt

twitter: @jessicahutt3

Radio Show

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Thank you to Mikalah Gordon for having our founder Torri Shack  on “The Morning Beat” radio show on 97.1 HD-2. She was there to talk about Tangible Movement as well as Suicide Prevention and Awareness Month. Its important to keep talking about matters related to Mental Illness, Suicideand Addiction. We as a collective need to bring as much consciousness as possible to these issues in order to help end the stigma and encourage individuals to seek help.

September 10th is World Suicide Prevention Day.

September 10th is World Suicide Prevention Day.


-Thank you to all of the individuals and organizations who dedicate their time to spreading awareness.

-Lets take some time today to remember the ones we have lost to suicide.

-Lets make a pledge to bring more awareness to suicide and mental illness in general.

-We can start by recognizing that people don’t “commit” suicide rather they die by suicide…. just like someone dies of a disease. 

-We need to start by changing little things like the verbiage we use to address and change the stigma surrounding death by suicide.

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9-year-old boy commits suicide after being bullied bc he came out as gay.

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

Jamel Myles died by suicide Thursday

His mother said he recently came out as gay and was bullied at school

(CNN) — A 9-year-old boy in Colorado took his life days after starting the fourth grade last week. He had recently come out as gay to his mother, who believes that bullying was a factor in his death, she told HLN's Mike Galanos on Tuesday.

"The same kids who picked on him last year were even meaner to him once he came out and said he was gay," said Leia Pierce, Jamel Myles' mother. "They hurt my baby."

Denver Police said that Jamel's death appears to be a suicide. 

 

Though suicides rates for those under 13 are far lower than for teens and adults, experts have looked closely at a rise in deaths in recent years -- and what makes suicide-related behavior different for young children.

"Impulsivity plays a big role in the suicidal behavior of young kids not thinking through actions," said John Ackerman, a clinical psychologist and suicide prevention coordinator for the Center for Suicide Prevention and Research at Nationwide Children's Hospital. Ackerman was not involved in evaluating Myles' case.

 

Ackerman said that for some young kids, it can be hard to process or put the brakes on heightened emotional responses. Whereas teens may go through a series of thoughts and stages before engaging in suicidal behavior, for young children, "an impulse towards suicide can escalate really quickly," he said.

From 1999 to 2016, 1,430 children ages 5 to 12 took their own lives in the United States, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There are 121 such deaths on record for 2016, up from 102 the year before.

These data don't account for nonfatal suicide attempts, but other research has seen a rise in that, too: The percentage of younger children and teens hospitalized for suicidal thoughts or attempts in the United States "almost doubled" between 2008 and 2015, according to a study published June in the journal Pediatrics. That study also found a seasonal pattern, with rates being lowest in the summer and highest in the spring and fall -- around the time when school is in session.

Not just a 'teenage problem'

 

"Many people, including medical professionals, think suicide is a teenage problem," Lisa Boesky, a private clinical psychologist and author who studies adolescent suicide, previously told CNN. "But suicide can happen at very young ages."

 

When looking for the warning signs for suicide in kids, "many people look for signs of depression," Boesky said. But that is more typical to teens, who tend to show mood swings and depression, she said. 

 

 A study in 2016 Found that kids under 12 who died by suicide were more likely to be diagnosed with attention-deficit disorder than older kids. The authors say this could mean younger kids with mental health issues are more susceptible to impulsively responding to problems in their lives.

"That doesn't mean that most kids with ADHD are suicidal," said Ackerman, who was not involved in that study, but it does highlight the role impulsivity might play.

Although kids tend to understand the concept of death by the fifth grade, "they don't always understand the permanence of death in the same way," he added.

'Kids are struggling'

 

Experts say that bullying and suicide are closely related but caution against drawing too direct a link.

 

According to a CDC report, both bullies and their victims may sustain "serious and lasting negative effects" on their mental health, and they are more likely to report high levels of suicide-related behavior. But bullying isn't necessarily a direct cause of suicide, the report says. Most kids affected by bullying don't engage in this behavior.

 

 

Asking for help

 

 The suicide rate in the United States has seen sharp increases in recent years. Studies have shown that the risk of suicide declines sharply when people call the national suicide hotline: 1-800-273-TALK.

There is also a crisis text line. For crisis support in Spanish, call 1-888-628-9454.

The lines are staffed by a mix of paid professionals and unpaid volunteers trained in crisis and suicide intervention. The confidential environment, the 24-hour accessibility, a caller's ability to hang up at any time and the person-centered care have helped its success, advocates say.

 

Youth and Young Adult Mental Health by the Numbers.

YOUTH/YOUNG ADULT MENTAL HEALTH BY THE NUMBERS via choc.org 

1) 1 in 5 young people have a diagnosable Mental disorder.

2) Half of people with lifetime mental illness have symptoms by age 14.

3) Suicide is the 2nd leading cause of death in children ages 10-24. 

-Awareness starting at a young age is imperative. -Treatment is available...it’s often the stigma that stands in the way of parents of youth and young adults seeking treatment.

Tangible Movements goal is to bring awareness, offer solutions, resources, support, coping mechanisms and end the stigma of mental illness.

Book us to speak at your school via the contact us tab on our website. 

 

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Tangible Movement Presents at Southeastern Symposium On Mental Health in Greenville, SC

 

One minute teaser video from Torri Shack’s Presentation topic of : Mental Illness in Teens and Young Adults

 

The 2018 Southeastern Symposium on Mental Health Collaborations: Diversity and Inclusion-Integrating Research, Education, and Practice!

 

The theme for 2018 is Mental Health Collaborations: Diversity and Inclusion – Integrating Research, Education, and Practice. This annual educational forum will facilitate collaboration among patients, caregivers, healthcare providers, academicians and community partners for those suffering with mental illness.

The Executive Committee of the SESMH and our partners are committed to advancing the welfare of our communities through improving access to mental health care, knowledge and education. We are excited about the diversity of our program and the culmination of our collaborative efforts. We look forward to your participation in this annual event.

 

SYMPOSIUM OVERVIEW

The 2018 Southeastern Symposium on Mental Health will feature:

·       Top-notch psychiatrists, researchers, psychologists and clinicians providing tools and resources to advance and sustain recovery from mental illness

·       Professional and mental health consumers discussing how they cope with their own mental illness and with clients or family members who have mental illness, while providing stories of experience and perspective on recovery

·       Networking opportunities

·       Topics about living with mental illness

·       Cutting-edge research updates and innovative recovery initiatives

 

 

Tangible Movement Presents at UC Davis Mental Health Conference 2018

We are proud and honored that our founder, Torri Shack, was selected to speak at the UC Davis Mental Health Conference on January 20th 2018. She told her story and spoke about the 4 different types of Bi-Polar Disorder. The UC Davis Mental Health Conference is an entirely student-led initiative that aims to engage students in de-stigmatization and education efforts, prompt attendees to organize around mental health issues, and offer them the opportunity for self reflection and healing through mental health discourse.