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Wellness Wednesday - Intro to Wellness!

Good morning everyone, and welcome to Tangible Movement’s first ever Wellness Wednesday! Wellness is one of the topics I am most excited to write about, as it is rich both in content and in universal importance. According to the World Health Organization, the term ‘wellness’ refers to “...a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being, not merely the absence of disease or infirmity”. In other words, wellness is an ongoing journey that affects all areas of an individual. Because today marks the premiere of Wellness Wednesday, I thought it would be beneficial to provide an introduction to the wellness - specifically, its eight different dimensions. Each of these categories are related and of equal importance. By gaining an understanding of each of the eight dimensions, one can achieve peak wellness.

1. EMOTIONAL WELLNESS

Emotional wellness is concerned with gaining an understanding of one’s feelings. A person with a high level of emotional wellness will be able to successfully handle change, disappointment, and hard times. Some topics within the realm of emotional wellness are self-care, setting priorities, getting quality sleep, building relationships, and coping with grief. According to the National Institutes of Health, people who are emotionally well “have fewer negative emotions and are able to bounce back from difficulties faster.” They are also “able to hold onto positive emotions longer and appreciate the good times”.

2. ENVIRONMENTAL WELLNESS

Environmental wellness considers living a life in harmony with nature. It encourages us to be respectful of our surroundings and to take actions to protect them. The best way to improve environmental wellness is simply to become more aware! Some steps to take to increase your environmental wellness are to volunteer, compost, conserve water and energy, recycle, and research! Environmental wellness is important because it leads to a more balanced lifestyle and makes real change in the world. A great way to get started on this journey is to calculate your current impact on the environment, and try to reduce it!

This site will tell you how many Earths we would need if everyone had the same lifestyle as you, and what your personal “overshoot day” (the point at which resource consumption exceeds resource regeneration) is:  http://www.footprintcalculator.org/.

3. FINANCIAL WELLNESS

Financial wellness is the ability to successfully manage expenses and avoid excessive money-related anxiety. According to the 2017 Stress in America Survey, 62% of Americans have reported that money is a significant source of stress in their lives. Having strong financial wellness helps decrease this economic stress, which improves health. Financial wellness initiatives include debt management, retirement preparedness, budgeting, and more! Financial Finesse describes financial wellness as “a state of well-being where an individual has achieved minimal financial stress, established a strong financial foundation, and created an ongoing plan to help reach future financial goals”. The goal of a financially well America is to create a generation of stable individuals who have the capacity to withstand any economic changes in the country.

4. INTELLECTUAL WELLNESS

The term “intellectual wellness” refers to being constantly challenged and stimulated mentally. Having a high level of intellectual wellness is important because it motivates and inspires an individual to develop an understanding of themself and the relationship they have to their surroundings. Ways to improve intellectual wellness include becoming academically and culturally involved, finding and partaking in hobbies, being active in one’s community, traveling, and exploring the arts! People who are very intellectually well are more likely to have stronger problem solving, critical thinking, logical, and creative skills!

5. OCCUPATIONAL WELLNESS

Occupational wellness delves into the relationship that one has with their work. Having a higher level of occupational wellness increases personal satisfaction by improving the attitude that one has towards their career. In 2013, Forbes magazine reported that “work is more often a source of frustration than fulfillment for nearly 90% of the world’s workers.” Finding a career that suits you is vital because working takes up the majority of your time during the week, so the way that you feel about it will contribute to your overall well-being. Some suggestions to begin the journey towards occupational wellness are to reflect on your skillset and what you enjoy, set realistic career goals, and use volunteering and interning as an opportunity to explore different career choices in the professional world.

6. PHYSICAL WELLNESS

Physical wellness is focused on keeping the body in top condition so that it can function as effectively as possible. Elements of physical wellness include nutrition, activity, and overall healthy lifestyle. Steps to take on the path towards physical wellness include engaging in daily exercise, practicing portion control, consuming healthy meals, and getting 7-9 hours of sleep each night. Someone who has a high level of physical wellness will have a decreased risk of illness, a nutrient-rich diet, an active lifestyle, and a nurtured body. The benefits of physical wellness include enhanced self-esteem and self-control in addition to sharpened thinking and learning abilities. It is important to note that there is a direct relationship between physical and mental health.

7. SOCIAL WELLNESS

Social wellness deals with the relationships and connections that exist in our personal lives. Having a strong sense of social wellness is essential because it improves emotional resilience, provides a strong support system, encourages boundaries and communication, and develops trust and conflict management skills. In order to increase social wellness, one can make an effort to keep in touch with close friends and family, become more active in clubs and community, and learn to balance the demands of a social life with other parts of life. A person with higher social wellness will be well-adjusted, comfortable in social situations, assertive, and able to form meaningful connections.

8. SPIRITUAL WELLNESS

The eighth and final dimension of wellness is spiritual wellness. Spiritual wellness is the journey of finding meaning in one’s life and purpose in one’s existence. This is the most complex layer, as there are many ways to achieve spiritual wellness - religion is not the only way to get in touch with the spiritual self. Because spiritual wellness can only come from within and differs greatly between individuals, there is not a singular right way to achieve it. However, to start on the journey towards spiritual wellness, one can practice meditation and acceptance, reflect on life-changing events, seek a religious faith if desired, and consider who they are and why. A person with heightened spiritual wellness will appreciate their lives, find meaning in their experiences, and strike a balance between the inner self and the outer world.


I hope that this introduction was helpful, and wish you all the best of luck in your individual wellness journeys! By enforcing small changes in lifestyle, you can make a huge impact!

 

By: Jessica Hutt

insta: @jessica.hutt

twitter: @jessicahutt3  

Radio Show

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Thank you to Mikalah Gordon for having our founder Torri Shack  on “The Morning Beat” radio show on 97.1 HD-2. She was there to talk about Tangible Movement as well as Suicide Prevention and Awareness Month. Its important to keep talking about matters related to Mental Illness, Suicideand Addiction. We as a collective need to bring as much consciousness as possible to these issues in order to help end the stigma and encourage individuals to seek help.

Sherri Bankston’s personal story of how depression and her husbands suicide has effected her.

I am 54 years old with a family history of depression.  I began taking anti-depressants in my late 20's.  They worked and still do.  In the beginning, every couple of years I would stop taking the medication and think to myself...I can do this, I do not need the medication.  I was always back on the medication within a couple of months.  I have come to accept that depression is a mental illness and something I can’t help or tackle on my own.  My husband supported me and helped me through my ups and downs.
About 5 years ago, I noticed my husband was not the same and was showing signs of depression.  I talked to him about it, and having gone through it with me, I was surprised he was so dismissive about his own depression.  He refused to acknowledge that he too was not suffering from depression.  I believe his was brought on by his mother's Alzheimer's and Parkinson struggle and her ultimate death.  When my husband was going for a routine doctor visit, I called the doctors office and told them I thought he was depressed and asked them to speak to my husband about it.  They did and he was dismissive of them. 

Three years ago, my husband committed suicide by hanging himself.  Needless to say, the vision of him hanging in his underwear is a vision that is forever etched in my memory.  It is also a vision that wakes me up in the middle of the night, still, in a cold sweat. 

In addition to this memory, I have the  memory of telling my son that his father was dead, committed suicide and watching a 26 year old man, still my baby, drop to his knees in the parking lot sobbing.  This memory too also wakes me up some nights in a cold sweat.

I lost both of my parents during the past 5 years to illness/age, lost my husband to suicide and have seen my son experience something no 26 year old should have to experience. 

Grieving is one thing, but to grieve the loss of someone you lost because of suicide is an entirely different process.

I struggle with the anxiety of worrying if something happens to me, my son will have no parents.  To be honest this scares the shit out of me. 

Writing this email has taken me 2 days but it has been cathartic in a sense. 

If I can help one person, then it will be worth it. 

Thanks,
Sherri





"I shall pass through this world but once. Any good therefore that I can
do, or any kindness that I can show to any human being, let me do it now.
Let me not defer not neglect it, for I shall not pass this way again."    -  Unknown

September is Suicide Prevention and Awareness Month

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September is Suicide Prevention and Awareness Month. Do you have a personal story dealing with suicide or the loss of someone who committed suicide? If so we would like to feature your story on our blog to help bring about awareness. Please send an e-mail to info@tangiblemovement.org or fell free to post on our comment section. 

Youth and Young Adult Mental Health by the Numbers.

YOUTH/YOUNG ADULT MENTAL HEALTH BY THE NUMBERS via choc.org 

1) 1 in 5 young people have a diagnosable Mental disorder.

2) Half of people with lifetime mental illness have symptoms by age 14.

3) Suicide is the 2nd leading cause of death in children ages 10-24. 

-Awareness starting at a young age is imperative. -Treatment is available...it’s often the stigma that stands in the way of parents of youth and young adults seeking treatment.

Tangible Movements goal is to bring awareness, offer solutions, resources, support, coping mechanisms and end the stigma of mental illness.

Book us to speak at your school via the contact us tab on our website. 

 

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Tangible Movement Presents at UC Davis Mental Health Conference 2018

We are proud and honored that our founder, Torri Shack, was selected to speak at the UC Davis Mental Health Conference on January 20th 2018. She told her story and spoke about the 4 different types of Bi-Polar Disorder. The UC Davis Mental Health Conference is an entirely student-led initiative that aims to engage students in de-stigmatization and education efforts, prompt attendees to organize around mental health issues, and offer them the opportunity for self reflection and healing through mental health discourse.